Police recruitment seminar in Christchurch - a huge success!

Police recruitment seminar in Christchurch - a huge success!

Over 400 Canterburians, many of them migrants, responded to NZ Police's call for a more diverse force on July 16 in Christchurch

 Inspector Hirone Waretini, in-charge of Canterbury Police Maori, Pacific and Ethnic Services Group (MPES), and his team motivating the attendees to join the police

Inspector Hirone Waretini, in-charge of Canterbury Police Maori, Pacific and Ethnic Services Group (MPES), and his team motivating the attendees to join the police

The recruitment seminar organised by the Canterbury Police on July 16 was first of its kind. The response - that both Kiwis and migrants gave it - was also first of its kind. Inspector Hirone Waretini - the brain behind the recruitment drive - was overwhelmed by the response.

The police estimated that almost 400 people attended the seminar with a second session being mandated. The police had planned only one session initially.

Currently 11.2% of police officers in Canterbury district identify with ethnicity that isn’t European. This is made up of 7.6% Maori, 1.8% Pacific, 1.2% Asian, and 0.6% recorded as others. That’s why the Police is seeking to recruit a broad base of young New Zealanders, mainly women, Maori, Pacific Islanders, Indian, African and Asian ethnicities. This is to ensure that the force remains responsive to the needs of all communities who have made New Zealand their new home.

 The sessions [one was planned but a second was needed because of the overwhelming response] were jam-packed

The sessions [one was planned but a second was needed because of the overwhelming response] were jam-packed

During the seminar Glen Robertson from Canterbury Police shared with potential recruits the training procedure and the physical competencies needed for the job.

Meanwhile, Hirone also noted, “There are over 30 possible career paths in NZ police from e-crime to youth aid, financial crime and the dive squad - we have something for whatever you’re into”.

The Inspector, recognising that money is also a motivator for young people, added, “You will be paid while you complete training at Royal NZ Police College. After graduating, you will earn a salary over $52,000 per annum. This is way more than what junior teachers or junior lawyers earn.”

Lee Brothers, who declined to give their first names but shared that they have been in Christchurch for the last 10 years, attended the first session and seemed excited by the opportunity. However, the brothers were a bit concerned about work-life balance of people who are part of the Force. To this, Hirone explained, “I have been in the Force for more than 20 years now and can safely say that balancing recreation, family life and work is achievable while being in the Police. The Organisation provides flexible employment opportunities and more time off than most other careers.”

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